Mission & Purpose

First Voice

First Voice is the regional voice for member and affiliated organisations that provide listening and spoken language early intervention services for children who are deaf or hearing-impaired.

The organisation plays a leadership role within the early childhood hearing loss sector, advocating for world-class early intervention services for children who are deaf or hearing-impaired.

We work with government and other organisations to influence public policy and clinical practice related to services for children who are deaf and hearing-impaired.

Our members and affiliated organisations maintain an active research agenda and work with leading research institutions to conduct hearing research relevant to young people with hearing loss.

First Voice is committed to providing evidence-based research to inform and influence public health policy in our region.

Our mission and purpose

First Voice champions the right of all deaf people to listen and speak.

Our mission

It is First Voice’s mission to:

  • raise awareness of early childhood deafness and the urgency of early intervention for hearing-impaired children
  • promote universal newborn hearing screening and the implementation of adequately funded and timely management pathways
  • pursue national fundraising opportunities for listening and spoken language services and related research
  • advocate for equitable and timely access to evidence-based early intervention services and mainstream inclusion for children who are deaf.

Our purpose

Our purpose is to ensure that every hearing-impaired child and their family in Australia and New Zealand have access to what they need to achieve the spoken language of which they are capable.

We advocate for world-class early intervention services that give children the listening and spoken language skills necessary to achieve mainstream education, employment of choice and social integration within the hearing world.

Key principles

The following six principles are integral to children achieving the spoken language of which they are capable:

  1. early identification
  2. access to assistive technologies
  3. family support and education
  4. transition to mainstream education
  5. evidence-based therapies
  6. universal access to diagnosis, assessment and treatment, particularly in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, rural and multi-cultural communities.